Hiphop karaoke, going down on k rd at Iron Bar….

Hiphop karaoke, going down on k rd at Iron Bar….

component1:

#smartphonesdumbpeople#component #auckland #nz

component1:

#smartphonesdumbpeople#component #auckland #nz

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audioculturenz:

1981 Swingers setlist from the August / September tour of NZ, penned by Phil Judd. The Swingers @ AudioCulture .

audioculturenz:

1981 Swingers setlist from the August / September tour of NZ, penned by Phil Judd. The Swingers @ AudioCulture .

3 notes

riuclassic:

Issue 17, November 1978, page 16
Band File #3 - The Scavengers
Don McLean live review
Gig guide


Scavengers fan club. c/Simon Grigg, Taste Records. Send $20, get nothing”

riuclassic:

Issue 17, November 1978, page 16

Band File #3 - The Scavengers

Don McLean live review

Gig guide

Scavengers fan club. c/Simon Grigg, Taste Records. Send $20, get nothing”

1 note

Che Fu gets lifetime award, hints at new music via Dawn Raid tie-in


Che Fu will be honoured with a lifetime achievement award at next week’s Pacific Music Awards. He’s also finally got himself a new label, and promises some new music for 2014. His last new album was in 2005, so it’s been a minute ( he has had a number of guest spots to keep up his recording profile tho). Bring it, Che!

Press release: “With Che-Fu’s prolific career to be recognised at the 2014 Vodafone Pacific Music Awards this coming Thursday 8 May where he will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award for his contribution to New Zealand Pacific Music, the local legend is pleased to announce the next step in his career with new music to be released in 2014 via an exciting joint venture between Illion Records and Dawn Raid Entertainment.

As one of New Zealand’s hip hop pioneers, Che-Fu’s extensive career paved the way for many of today’s New Zealand Pasifika, soul, hip hop and reggae performers. The award comes as a fitting acknowledgement to one of our Kiwi greats for the massive impact and influence he has had on shaping the scene, as well as adding further credence to his critically acclaimed back-catalogue.

But while Che-Fu’s work may be enough to fill a lifetime, he’s showing no signs of slowing down yet.

"Don’t get it twisted, I’m still in my late 30’s (just barely) lol. But, seriously, I’m very humbled and honoured to be a recipient of such a prestigious award. I am proud to represent this region of the Pacific, and its people, and I will to continue to do so through my music, and my actions. Oue tulou kia mutolu oti. Fari," he said.

With new singles and his fourth studio record tipped for 2014, as well as a number of shows in the works, fans can expect to hear Che’s sweet soul croon across airwaves and stages alike- including joining the infamous line-up for Dawn Raid’s 15 Year Anniversary Tour.

See Che-Fu live at the following venues as part of the Dawn Raid 15 Year Anniversary Tour [alongside Savage, Aaradhna, Deceptikonz, Sammy J, Monsta, BrownHill, DJ Peter Gunz and Brotha D], and stay tuned for further details on his up-coming releases.

Wellington - James Cabaret - Friday 23rd May 
Tickets: on sale Friday 2 May via dashtickets.co.nz

Auckland - The Studio - Saturday 24th May 
Tickets: on sale now via dashtickets.co.nz

Melbourne - The Espy - Thursday 29th May 
Tickets: espy.com.au

Brisbane - Acacia Ridges Hotel - Friday 30th May 
Tickets: moshtix.com.au

Sydney - OneWorld Bar - Saturday 31st May
Tickets: moshtix.com.au
More: Che Fu on how he wrote the classic hook for Chains in the toilet at the studio in 30 seconds, right before he sang it. Seriously. 

Out April 29 on 7”vinyl/digital on Cherries Records, very cool slice of modern boogie funk.

"For their 7th release, Cherries brings a different sound to your speakers, created by the return of ‘the first lady of modern funk’ AMALIA, in collaboration with a new group, straight out of the West Coast underground, SOCIAL LOVERS.

With this release, the Social Lovers sound takes you downstairs to the basement after-hours party, where people dance close into the wee hours of the night.

The A-Side, ‘So Right (feat. AMALIA)’ leads off with an enchanting arpeggiation, while the synth and drums connect with AMALIA’s spacey and soulful vocals to create a lush, warm pillow of funk to your ear drums. AMALIA waxes deep on a lover who is the perfect one, but soon becomes the wrong one, a melodic reminder that we are all looking for something real.

‘Call Me Up’, the B-Side brings Cherries closer to its Chicago roots with an instrumental, soulful house inspired tune, full of percussion and natural ebbs and flows of synth chords and strong melody. Social Lovers’ lush and polished production is showcased here with a brief taste of the smooth street soul sounds that the collective five thrives on, to keep you dancing in the basement ‘til the break of dawn.”

audioculturenz:

Phil Fuemana at the 1995 NZ Music Awards. The head of an extraordinary family, one of whom became the first New Zealand solo artist to hit No.1 in the US, and a mentor to a whole generation of aspiring young South Auckland musicians, Phil passed away in 2005.

audioculturenz:

Phil Fuemana at the 1995 NZ Music Awards. The head of an extraordinary family, one of whom became the first New Zealand solo artist to hit No.1 in the US, and a mentor to a whole generation of aspiring young South Auckland musicians, Phil passed away in 2005.

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 Amoeba Music SF, spot the NZer in the queue… 

Tommy Adderley w Max Merritt and the Meteors serve up a wonderful, rocking version of Whole Lotta Shakin Going On, w/ I Just Don’t Understand on the A side, which was a chart success for Tommy in the US (on the Chess label, no less!) and Canada in 1964. I Just Don’t Understand had previously been a hit for Ann Margaret back in 1961. I recently scored this on vinyl, very happy with it.

It was released in NZ and Australia by Viking Records (VS156), who licenced it to Chess in the US - they released it on subsidiary label, Mar Mar (Mar Mar 314). The song also came out in Canada on Quality Records (1672X), and also Chess (M314), which led to a contract dispute over who had North American rights, with both labels stopping pressing it, which led to the single rapidly dropping off the Canadian charts.



In her biography of Adderley, published in 2003, author Christine Mintrom describes how the session came about, saying “Max Merritt and the Meteors were the house band at Viking Records in those days. Tommy suggested to Max they cash in on the Liverpool mania and do a Liverpool waltz. Tommy had a Brummie accent, but he could do ‘Scouse’ … he was performing lots of Liverpudlian hits, taking on the whole persona, and wanted I Just Don’t Understand done Freddie and the Dreamers-style, with a kazoo.

"Tommy, Max and the band put down the track in about an hour at the Viking Studios, in a studio 4.5m by 1.5m. Johnny Dick, the Meteors drummer, obliged with a kazoo solo. The single received a lot of airplay in New Zealand and was reasonably successful. Another version of this song was recorded live, On the Peter Posa Show.

"Viking had done a deal with Chess .. a package of three New Zealand records went to Chess for release in North America. [Chess released the Adderley record, along with Sweet and Tender romance/Giddy up a ding dong by Max Merritt and the Meteors, while Peter Posa’s White Rabbit was on Interphon].






"Well-known New Zealand journalist and music writer John Berry observed the song’s progress on the American Cash Box listings. He rang Tommy when it was hovering just under the Hot 100. Tommy was informed as the single got on to the Cash Box listings and got to a position in the 80s. It has variously been noted as getting to No 86, 83 or 81. Chess Records often did well on Cash Box.

"I Just Don’t Understand was released simultaneously in Canada and went to No 2 there, when A Hard Day’s Night was No 1. For some unexplained reason the single, which was released on Mar-Mar, a subsidiary of Chess in the States, was released on Quality, a Canadian label in that country [the Quality label above states they had licenced it ‘By arrangement with Mar-Mar Records New Zealand’, which clearly isn’t true]. It sold over 150,000 copies.

"Unfortunately there there was a dispute over who owned the release rights in North America. This contractual dispute meant neither company would release any more copies of the single, and its chart success stopped, quickly, just as it had started."

Christine Mintrom notes however, that in the course of her research for the book, she had been unable to verify the Cash Box listing or the Canadian chart placing. She notes that someone made money off it, just not Tommy.

Mintrom writes : “Graham Dent, was managing Tommy then: “They made a hang of a lot of money out of it. Tommy never got a cent”. … Right up to the time he died, Tommy stirred Graham about this every time he saw him: “Never got those bloody royalties, Gray.”

"When he related this story for his oral history tape [recorded in 1992 with Roger Watkins, a year before his death], Tommy sounded indignant; both that he got little money from this successful single, and that he had received no press coverage in 1964 for having a hit which was doing so well overseas. He said he tried to find out what happened, but "Only got lies and bullshit." And then Viking Records folded."

Source: "Tommy Adderley (1940 - 1993): The man and his contributions to pop, jazz and rock music in New Zealand", by Christine Mintrom, published by iUniverse Inc, 1993.

Mintrom notes that Adderley wanted to do I Just Don’t Understand ‘Freddie and the Dreamers-style’ -interestingly, poparchives.com.au lists Freddie and the Dreamers as doing a cover of that same song also in 1964 - did Tommy hear that version before he did his own? Who knows. That Freddie and the Dreamers record may never have been released in NZ. Poparchives lists Adderley’s version as charting in Melbourne. The Beatles had played it for aBBC radio session in mid-1963. Did Tommy hear that?

This page lists US and Canadian radio stations playing Adderley’s song. The Canadian charts of that era available online show the Beatles with Hard Day’s Night (mentioned above) at No 2 in Sept 1964, behind the Supremes, no listing for Tommy. This archive of Canadian singles charts suggests that around the time the song was getting radio play in Canada (Oct/Nov 64), it failed to impact the charts, although this archive for 1964 charts is incomplete.


Read more about Tommy Adderley’s life in show business, over at Audioculture. He was instrumental in getting our liquor laws relaxed, thru running clubs in the early 70s. You think staying out clubbing til 4 am is radical - you couldn’t go out and drink after 6pm (aka ‘the six o’clock swill’) in New Zealand prior to 1967, the year when 10pm closing became the new norm, after a public referendum.

Fascinating to see the variety of reactions from various folks I know to Lorde fronting Nirvana for All Apologies. Some folks thought it was awesome, some a bit more skeptical, suggesting there were other music vets better suited than a popstar come lately, and Lorde wasnt even born when that song came out. Or perhaps Nirvana figured using Lorde was a great way to introduce their band to her fanbase, who have probably never heard of Nirvana. Kinda like Lorde wearing a Cramps tshirt on Rolling Stone cover belatedly exposed that band to new fans. Would Nirvana be that cynical?

Fascinating to see the variety of reactions from various folks I know to Lorde fronting Nirvana for All Apologies. Some folks thought it was awesome, some a bit more skeptical, suggesting there were other music vets better suited than a popstar come lately, and Lorde wasnt even born when that song came out. 

Or perhaps Nirvana figured using Lorde was a great way to introduce their band to her fanbase, who have probably never heard of Nirvana. Kinda like Lorde wearing a Cramps tshirt on Rolling Stone cover belatedly exposed that band to new fans. Would Nirvana be that cynical?